Moshi Moshi
Restaurant

Located within Liverpool Street Station, Moshi Moshi sushi restaurant is no stranger to sustainability. It was the first restaurant in the UK to take bluefin tuna off its menus in 1998 and was one of the first five to attain Marine Stewardship Accreditation. FoodSave was a great opportunity to boost Moshi Moshi’s already impressive sustainability credentials. They were able to save 1.2 tonnes, £14,837, in annual food waste thanks to FoodSave.

The FoodSave team monitored kitchen waste using the Winnow Waste Monitor System for four weeks. During the audit all food waste was measured including inventory spoilage, preparation waste, and plate waste. The system required minimal time and caused no disruption to service. There were opportunities for all staff to get involved; monitoring and recording what is left at the end of the day and noting the top three items staff take home to identify the highest waste items in ‘prepared not served’.

Plate waste and prepared not served waste were identified as the biggest source of costs, accounting for over 75% of food waste. Thanks to FoodSave, £209 was saved in food waste costs per week over the course of the project. An annual reduction of 858kg of food waste weight was calculated, achieving a cover-adjusted weight of 1.2 tonnes being diverted from landfill. Identifying where food waste was coming from helped to pin point how to tackle it.

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The Shed
Restaurant

The Shed Restaurant in Notting Hill is run by brothers Oliver and Richard Gladwin, and is an extension of their rural West Sussex lifestyle. Already focussed on minimising waste in their kitchen, the brothers embrace ‘nose-to-tail-cooking’ making sure no part of the animal goes to waste. They signed up to FoodSave to gain that extra level of detail and to refine their waste minimisation practices. Following the FoodSave project The Shed could identify savings of £2,476 per year, and reduce its waste by 0.17 tonnes.

The FoodSave team monitored kitchen waste using the Winnow Waste Monitor System over a period of four weeks. During the audit, all food waste was measured, including inventory spoilage, preparation waste, and plate waste. The system required minimal time and caused no disruption to service. The FoodSave team met with The Shed weekly to review the results and identify actions for waste reduction.

The sustainable ethos of The Shed meant that their food waste production was already very low, however FoodSave still achieved a 23% reduction in waste. Using the food waste audit, prepared-but-not-served food was identified as a major source of food waste, and was reduced by 63% over the four week period. Total waste fell by 5kg per week, equating to 258kg per year, and an annual saving of £2,476. These outcomes will help The Shed to re-draft its staff policy on food waste and incorporate information from the FoodSave programme to encourage staff to be more mindful about what goes in the bin.

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The Imperial
Restaurant

The Imperial is a restaurant in Fulham that serves international dishes using largely British produce. Owner Kate MacWhirter takes great pride in sustainability.Already taking initiatives to grow their own vegetables and recycle food waste, it seemed natural for The Imperial to take part in the four-week FoodSave audit and try to reduce its food waste. The restaurant saved £10,178 and over 3 tonnes in annual food waste and related packaging.

The FoodSave team monitored kitchen waste using the Winnow’s Waste Monitor System for four weeks. It required minimal time (less than 10 minutes per day across all staff) and caused no disruption to service. The FoodSave team met with The Imperial weekly to review the results and identify actions for waste reduction. The audit has been a huge success, with the Environment Adviser to the Mayor of London, Matthew Pencharz, making a visit to the Imperial to see the system in action and hear how much has been saved in weight and cost.

The Imperial saved £10,178 and over 3 tonnes in annual food waste and related packaging. The biggest savings came in customer plate waste, which fell by 54% in value over the course of the four weeks. Identifying waste streams helped the team identify where best to target reduction opportunities and in turn this helped The Imperial save on purchasing costs. The charts extracted from the weekly data also helped create a greater sense of significance to the food being prepared and thrown out at the restaurant.

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